CONFIDENTIAL REPORT 2G-9C
S39
     
 
FORMER GERMAN SUBMARINE TYPE IX-C
 
 
 
 
INSULATION AND LAGGING
 
     
 
SUMMARY
 
     
          Neither the type nor the amount of insulation lagging present anything of interest.  Very little of either is employed, and where employed it has not been provided in such a manner as to obtain maximum effect.  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 
July, 1946
 
 
 
 
PORTSMOUTH NAVAL SHIPYARD, PORTSMOUTH, N. H.
 
     
 
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9C-S39
     
  1.  Description  
          Neither lagging nor insulation is employed to any great degree.  
          Glass fiber batt lagging, with a covering of glass fiber burlap secured in place by backs of soft iron wire, is used to insulate the main engine and diesel compressor exhaust piping from the operating unit up to and including the inboard exhaust valves.  
          The same material is used to insulate the hot sea water line to the galley.  
          The thickness varies from a maximum of about two inches on the inboard exhaust valves down to about 1/2 inch on the water pipe.  
          Granulated cork insulation is provided for the refrigerator storage compartment.  About four inches of insulating material is used, with an aluminum foil backing on the surrounding structure.  
          The radio and sound rooms are sound insulated by .78" match boarding backed by .78" block cork.  
          Magazine insulation is limited to that obtainable by a .78" wooden lining.  
          The foregoing is the extent of the insulation and lagging provided, as such.  Some minor insulating effect is obtained by the compartment lining, which consists of thin panels of fire-resistant pressed wood laid on furring pieces to provide an air space of about 2 inches between the pressure hull and the lining.  This lining is not installed throughout the vessel.  
     
  2.  Comment  
          Both insulation and lagging are reduced to barest essentials, and it is quite obviously not considered very important by the Germans.  
     
     
     
     
 
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