CONFIDENTIAL REPORT 2G-9C
S30
     
 
FORMER GERMAN SUBMARINE TYPE IX-C
 
 
 
 
STOREROOMS AND MISCELANEOUS STOWAGE
 
     
 
SUMMARY
 
     
          Limited provisions storage, and limited refrigerator space are the only points of interest in this section.  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
 
March, 1946
 
 
 
 
PORTSMOUTH NAVAL SHIPYARD, PORTSMOUTH, N. H.
 
     
 
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9C-S30
     
          This type of vessel has no storerooms or issuing rooms.  There are many lockers in all parts of the vessel however.  
          Special storage consists of lockers for deck gear in the superstructure, ready service lockers adjacent to the deck gun and to the machine guns on the bridge, pressure proof stowages for torpedoes and a pressure-proof tank for a rubber boat.  
          Stowage for acetylene and nitrogen flasks is provided within the conning tower fairwater.  
          The only specific provision stowage provided was in the galley, where a galley refrigerator and a locker were installed.  Provisions were stowed in lockers throughout the length of the vessel, and in magazines in space not occupied by munitions.  
          Provision stowage appears to have been insufficient; for when vessels were surrendered, large caches of canned food were found in any possible space; outboard of the main motors and main engines, outboard of the diving station, in fact any space not otherwise fully occupied.  In addition, such items as hams and sausages were hung from the overhead.  The only refrigerated space was the aforementioned small built-in galley refrigerator.  
     
  Comment:  
          For general stowage, German practice and U.S. Naval practice parallel each other, in that lockers are provided for items to be contained therein, in large number throughout the vessel.  Corresponding deck containers and deck lockers were provided for appropriate stowage items.  
          Provision stowage, while it may have been sufficient under the conditions for which the vessel was designed, was apparently not enough under the operating conditions at the end of the war, and was not comparable with U.S. Naval practice either in arrangement or in character.  
          The limited size of the refrigerator is evidence both of the operating conditions for which the vessel was designed, and the character of the crew's diet while on patrol.  
     
     
     
     
 
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